Free/Fall

While we wait for the release of Nemesis in a few weeks, here are some free reads for you to enjoy.

The first of them is a brand new novella set in the town of Milestone (the fictional setting for my novel Currency of Souls, and the novella Thirty Miles South of Dry County), entitled “When the Shadows are Hungry and Cold”. It’s currently available via Subterranean magazine online, but if reading on your computer doesn’t float your boat, the magazine is also available for digital download on Amazon.com.

Also in the Subterranean Press archives, you can read three more stories of mine for free: “The Acquaintance”, “Saturday Night at Eddie’s” and “Head in the Clouds”. All of these stories are also available for digital download on Amazon.com, Smashwords, B&N, and all digital booksellers, either as standalone stories (“The Acquaintance” and “Saturday Night at Eddie’s”) or as part of a collection (“Head in the Clouds” in Theater Macabre), though they’re all paid titles.

“Underneath” is still available as a free download on Amazon UK.

And as always, The Turtle Boy, the first book in the Timmy Quinn series, which will conclude with the forthcoming novel-length volume Nemesis, is free wherever e-books are sold.

New Novella Free Online

 

I’m delighted to announce that my novella “When the Shadows are Hungry and Cold” is now available free to read at Subterranean Online as part of their Fall lineup.

In 2007, Subterranean published my novel Currency of Souls, which was set in Milestone, a town that draws lost souls to itself for its own insidious ends. In this new novella, we return to that accursed place years before the events in the novel for the grim story of a weak-willed deputy and the peculiar woman he encounters late one night on the border of a town famed for its high volume of inexplicable car accidents.

This issue also features cracking fiction by Nnedi Okorafor, Maria Dahvana Headley, and Brian Lumley.

Check it out here.

THE SEVEN: Robert McCammon

Continuing my interview series called THE SEVEN, in which I invite some of my favorite authors to answer seven questions about their most recent projects, today’s guest surely needs no introduction. Robert McCammon is one of the reasons I’m a writer today. From the apocalyptic SWAN SONG, and the epic coming of age novels MYSTERY WALK and BOY’S LIFE to the more recent thriller and love letter to rock-and-roll, THE FIVE (read my review here) and the Matthew Corbett series (SPEAKS THE NIGHTBIRD, THE QUEEN OF BEDLAM, and MISTER SLAUGHTER), McCammon has penned many of the books that not only defined my love for the genre and solidified my desire to be a storyteller, but also proved instructional in how to make a story transcend its genre label. I am far from the only fan who rejoiced when he began publishing again after a decade-long hiatus, and I am pleased to see that he shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon.

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Q. What is your most recent release?

A. My most recent release is THE PROVIDENCE RIDER, which is a mystery/suspense/thriller set in Colonial America in the 1700s. The book moves from New York to Pendulum Island in the Bahamas.

Q. What inspired the project?

A. The project is the 4th book of a planned series of ten. It centers around my young detective hero, Matthew Corbett, and his on-going battle with the “enigmatic emperor of crime”, Professor Fell.

Q. What is the primary theme you’ve chosen to explore with this project?

A. In this particular book, the theme involves the chain of predators, and how Matthew is required to disguise himself as a predator to do the bidding of Professor Fell, yet remain true to himself. Professor Fell threatens to blow up New York if Matthew doesn’t find out for him who has betrayed him regarding a new weapon Fell has created and is selling to the enemies of England.

Q. Of everything you’ve written to date, which project has been the most difficult for you?

A. Hmmm…STINGER was difficult to finish up because it was set in 24 hours and everybody had to be where they needed to be at the end of that time. MISTER SLAUGHTER–one of the Matthew series books–was difficult in places, just in terms of where the story would go next since I had a lot of choices.

I’d say STINGER because of that time element. I remember having to rewrite large parts of it to make sure the ending would work out.

Q. Which title would you suggest as a good introduction for newcomers to your work, and why?

A. I would say BOY’S LIFE, since it seems to appeal to so many different age groups.

Q. What are your thoughts on the burgeoning digital market?

A. It’s interesting to watch it develop. I think it has a long way to go. There’s much confusion in it right now, it seems. Of course I do like a bound book. I like the way it feels and smells. I like the weight of ideas I can feel in holding a book. But there’s a lot of promise and potential in the digital market, just have to wait and see how it develops.

Q. What’s next for you?

A. I’m finishing a novella for Subterranean Press and then on to a big horror/science fiction book. Next up in the Matthew series is THE RIVER OF SOULS, which I’m working on also. So there’s a lot going on, and a lot ahead!

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Find out all the latest news from this author at Robert McCammon.com and MatthewCorbettsWorld.com

Post a comment below to be in with a chance to win a deluxe hardcover edition of THE PROVIDENCE RIDER, the fourth book in the Matthew Corbett series, generously donated by Bill Schafer at Subterranean Press

THE SEVEN: Glen Hirshberg

As a new feature on this blog, I’m starting an interview series called THE SEVEN. I will be inviting some of my favorite authors to answer seven questions about their most recent projects. My first guest is the ever-gracious and always interesting Glen Hirshberg, who wowed me first with his novel The Snowman’s Children, and then again with the incredible collection The Two Sams (both are required reading for fans of literary horror.) And now, over to Glen:

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Q. What is your most recent release?

The Janus Tree and Other Stories. I also have a new novel, Motherless Child, which will be out one way or another–or maybe in more than one way–by the end of the year.

Q. What inspired the project?

Janus is a collection, and it just seemed the time had come. Motherless, though, emerged from one of the stories in the collection, when I woke up about a year after completing the story and realized I knew what happened five minutes after the original ending.

Q. What is the primary theme you’ve chosen to explore with this project?
 
Oh, you know. The usual, for me. Old Jews and insects. The disappearance of books. Death and how to live with it.
 
Q. Of everything you’ve written to date, which project has been the most difficult for you?

Without question, The Book of Bunk, the novel I published through Earthling in 2010. Why? I don’t know. I just couldn’t quite get it until I finally did. By accident. Having given up on it at least six times. Took me 13 years, in the end.
Q. Which title would you suggest as a good introduction for newcomers to your work, and why?

Getting harder for me to say. The Two Sams still contains my best-known stories, at this point, and who am I to argue? But the work, for better or worse, is getting pretty range-y. I hope it’s all still me, and I guess I’m lucky in the sense that nothing I’ve put out is anything I’m ashamed to have put out. So I hope people will be curious enough to pick up the book that seems most interesting to them. The new one, Motherless Child, feels the most commercial to me. But I certainly don’t have a track record of being the best judge of that…

Q. What are your thoughts on the burgeoning digital market?

Let it burgeon. I’m all for burgeoning markets. And reading, wherever that can happen.

Q. What’s next for you?

As noted above, I’ve already completed the next project. Now it’s on to the one after that. I’ve got one linked story set I’ve started–a peculiar sort of occult detective thing–and a young adult novel about domestic terrorism. And more ghost stories. And the haunted Great Lakes island novel I’ve got 2/3rds right, I think. One of those…

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Visit Glen on the web at www.glenhirshberg.com
Buy The Janus Tree & Other Stories at Subterranean Press